Pointe-Saint-Charles


Pointe-Saint-Charles one of the oldest neighborhoods in Montreal. Despite the decline of industrial activity in the 1950s, Art Deco-style factories were not abandoned by the local population. The re-appropriation of these places testifies to a sense of belonging related to the history of the workers, who contributed to the economic development of Montreal

Industrial Monuments Rehabilitated

A true architectural cradle, Pointe-Saint-Charles is seen as both a very lucrative area for real estate developers and a new dynamic pool for residents. In 1857, it is first the establishment of the railway company Grand Trunk Railway that will kick off the urbanization of this area. The listed buildings were built between 1880 and 1914, mostly on the edge of the Lachine Canal.

After the decline of the industrial era, most of these monuments were taken over by real estate firms that turned these spaces into commercial or residential condos. Measuring 2.1 million square feet, Nordelec remains the largest building in North America. The old electrical cable factory has been transformed into a business incubator and upscale housing.

The former Redpath refinery, which was founded at the same time, has also undergone renovations to be converted into sumptuous lofts.

Flourishing Businesses

Incorporated in the city of Montreal in 1932, the district of Pointe-Saint-Charles has two main arteries where the shops follow one another: Wellington Street and Center Street. The outdated windows and the modern layout of the recently installed shops meet on each side of the street. At choice, we can offer a second life to clothes by pushing the door of a thrift shop or encourage the creators spotted by the Krem shop.

To feast with ease, the brunch of ‘Ma Tante Quiche’ rivals all the trendy places of Sunday morning by combining culinary pleasure and seasonal products. Whether on site or to go, fresh products and pastries are always to be enjoyed with delight.

In a more Zen atmosphere, there is also the Café Bloom. At the same time place of exchanges and artistic exhibitions, the kitchen proposes menus adapted to every hour of the day. Brunch, prepared with a variety of eco-friendly products (where possible), is excellent and reasonably priced.

And on the Institutional Side

The inhabitants of the South-West are not obliged to leave Pointe-Saint-Charles to find carefully prepared hand-made smoked meat. Family Butchery Quebec’s Smoked Meat Products has been on the main street for several generations and offers tender and fresh cuts of meat.

Without any aesthetic or modern motivation, Chez Paul offers a fast food version home. Very affordable, the prices are displayed on old paintings Pepsi stamped and it is possible to play pool while savoring his Italian poutine. A real favorite!

 

A New Vocation of Heritage

While most historic buildings have incorporated new uses for commercial purposes, other buildings are in the public interest despite land pressures. Mixed Scottish and Irish immigration to French-speaking Canadians has made a significant contribution to the growth of Montreal, and it is in memory of these workers that the community of Pointe-Saint-Charles wishes to preserve its identity rooted in the industrial age. .

It was in 2009 that there was talk of mobilizing to recover Building 7 from the former property of CN and Alstom. Opposed to the project of the Casino, Collective 7 in US is created to preserve the walls of the building and bequeath a place of life, cultural and social vocation. Thanks to this citizen’s initiative, Pointe-Saint-Charles will benefit, among other things, from a day care center, a community kitchen and a unique exhibition space from 2018.

The other part of the Redpath refinery, mentioned above, has become the place to be for climbers of all levels. The Allez UP sports center has operated the former sugar silos for three years to offer the public the highest climbing routes in the city.

Although gentrification is often talked about in Montreal’s popular neighborhoods, the borough still has an accessible face with a desire for self-management by its citizens. With a third of its anglophone population, Pointe-Saint-Charles wishes to keep its authenticity and its multi-cultural heritage, while making its way through the effervescent neighborhoods of southwestern Montreal.

 

Credit: uneparisienneamontreal

Industrial Buildings in the Pointe Saint- Charles Neighborhood

Credit: imtl.org

 

RR Donnelley
1500, rue Saint-Patrick / Rue Condé
Quartier Pointe Saint-Charles
2nd floor
2007
RR Donnelley
Agmont America
1401, rue Saint-Patrick
Pointe Saint-Charles
2nd floor
1997

4 /10 : 12 votes
4 photos
Agmont America
Canadian Bag Company
2491, rue Saint-Patrick
Pointe Saint-Charles
3rd floor
1914

6.76 /10 : 17 votes
Canadian Bag Company
Le Nordelec
1730-1736, rue Saint-Patrick / Richardson /Richmond / Shearer
Pointe Saint-Charles
8th  floor
1913

7.3 /10 : 50 votes
26 photos
Le Nordelec
Redpath Sugar Refinery
1720, rue du Canal
Pointe Saint-Charles
6th floor
1908

7.51 /10 : 43 votes
8 photos
Raffinerie de sucre Redpath
Industrial building on St. Patrick
1396, rue Saint-Patrick
Pointe Saint-Charles
3rd floor
1905

7 /10 : 3 votes
3 photos
Édifice industriel sur Saint-Patrick
The Sherwin-William company
2855, rue Centre
Pointe Saint-Charles
4th floor
1903

7.6 /10 : 43 votes
5 photos
The Sherwin-William company
Belding, Paul and Company
1790, rue du Canal
Pointe Saint-Charles
5th floor
1884

8.35 /10 : 31 votes
6 photos
Belding, Paul and Company
The Bell Thelephone Co of Canada
Centre / Rue de Chateauguay
Pointe Saint-Charles
2nd floor

4.67 /10 : 3 votes
2 photos
The Bell Thelephone Co of Canada
Anciens Ateliers du CN
Rue le Ber
Pointe Saint-Charles
2nd floor

4.33 /10 : 3 votes
7 photos
Anciens Ateliers du CN